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Looking for girlfriend > Dating for life > Got my girlfriend pregnant at 16

Got my girlfriend pregnant at 16

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Can you help me? Hearing the news that your girlfriend is pregnant can be shocking and scary. The first reaction is often one of disbelief. Getting confirmation of the pregnancy is the first step. We offer free testing here at Pregnancy Resource Clinic and would love for her to come in for a test to make sure she is pregnant.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: I Became A Father At 16. I Was So Naive!

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 16 Year Boy Pregnant His Girlfriend Prank On Indian Mom - Pranks In India

As a minor, how can I get responsibility for my child?

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Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. Finding out you're pregnant when you're a teenager can be daunting, especially if the pregnancy wasn't planned, but help and support is available.

First, if you think you might be pregnant but you're not sure, it's important to take a pregnancy test as soon as possible to find out. If your pregnancy test is positive, it's understandable to feel mixed emotions: excitement about having a child, worry about telling your parents, and anxiety about pregnancy and childbirth.

Make sure to talk through your options and think carefully before you make any decisions. Try talking to a family member, friend or someone you trust. If you decide to continue your pregnancy, the next step is to start your antenatal care. If you decide not to continue with your pregnancy, you can talk to a GP or visit a sexual health clinic to discuss your options.

The Family Planning Association has more information about your pregnancy choices. If you decide to continue with your pregnancy, there are a wide range of services to support you during pregnancy and after you have had your baby. If you're pregnant and on your own, it's important there are people you can share your feelings with who can offer you support.

Find out more about having a baby if you're on your own. If you're pregnant or a mum, you're expected to stay at school and continue education until you finish Year Your school shouldn't treat you any differently. You can leave school at the end of Year The law says colleges, universities or your apprenticeship employer aren't allowed to treat you unfairly if you're pregnant or a mum. But if you're a student, you should be able to take maternity-related absence from studying after your baby's been born.

How long you take will depend on your situation and your particular course. Apprentices can take up to 52 weeks' maternity leave. If you're an apprentice, you may qualify for statutory maternity pay. Maternity Action has more information about maternity rights for apprentices. You can apply if you're going to study at school or sixth form college or on another publically funded course in England.

You can't get Care to Learn if you're an apprentice who gets a salary or if you're doing a higher education course at university. For more information, visit the GOV. Page last reviewed: 5 April Next review due: 5 April Teenage pregnancy support - Your pregnancy and baby guide Secondary navigation Getting pregnant Secrets to success Healthy diet Planning: things to think about Foods to avoid Alcohol Keep to a healthy weight Vitamins and supplements Exercise.

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Whatever your age, you can also ask for confidential advice from: your GP or practice nurse a contraception or sexual health clinic NHS — available 24 hours a day, days a year It's your decision, but don't ignore the situation, hoping it will go away. Your options are: continuing with the pregnancy and keeping the baby having an abortion continuing with the pregnancy and having the baby adopted If you decide to continue your pregnancy, the next step is to start your antenatal care.

They can refer you for an assessment at a clinic or hospital if you choose to have an abortion. What support is there for pregnant teenagers? You can get support and advice from: Brook — visit your nearest Brook service for free confidential advice if you're under 25, or use the Ask Brook online service Family Lives — visit the website or call for support for families, including young parents Tommy's — visit this website led by midwives for the latest information for parents-to-be Family Nurse Partnership — a family nurse may be able to visit your home, if you're young parents, to support you from early pregnancy until your child is 2 Shelter — a national housing charity that can advise you about housing options and housing benefits for young parents; visit their website or call them on If you're pregnant and on your own, it's important there are people you can share your feelings with who can offer you support.

Can I carry on with my education while I'm pregnant? At school Yes, you can stay at school up until the birth and then return to school afterwards. You're also entitled to a maximum week break immediately before and after the birth. Further or higher education You can only get maternity pay if you have a job, so very few students are eligible. Apprenticeships Apprentices can take up to 52 weeks' maternity leave.

im 16 and got my girlfriend pregnant what do it do?

As a rule, you must be 18 or over before you can exercise responsibility for a child. In other words, you must be legally an adult. But if you are a mother aged 16 or 17, you can ask the court to declare you an adult so that you can get responsibility for your child. If you are pregnant at the age of 16 or 17, you can get responsibility for your child by marrying or entering into a registered partnership. The court will declare you an adult if it believes that this would be in the interests of you and your child.

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Hello, I'm an 18 year old guy who found out a week before my birthday that my 16 year old teenage girlfriend is pregnant. First off, is it illegal to continue having sex with her in Missouri? In addition to an already scary time for myself, her parents are legitimately crazy. They will say one thing yet do another, lie to me and her about ridiculous things, I know my girlfriend wants an abortion and doesn't want to keep the baby, but since she is a minor her parents aren't allowing abortion or any other option then to keep it.

Ask A Woman: My Girlfriend Is Underage And Pregnant - What Now?

News Corp is a network of leading companies in the worlds of diversified media, news, education, and information services. None of us are 16 yet and I feel like my entire life is falling apart. I had been dating my girlfriend for a year. Whenever I went out with her I just said I was with friends. We had sex then and a few more times in the weeks after. It was unprotected — I realise now how stupid that was. A couple of months after this we had an argument.

I am 15 and my boyfriend is 17. Will he be arrested for getting me pregnant?

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We went to the abortion clinic on 59th Street.

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I am hurt and can't stop crying. My year-old son got his girlfriend pregnant and she is determined to keep the baby. My husband and I do not support teenage pregnancy and we have been very clear and open with our kids about sex.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 16 Year Old Girl Told Her Mom She Pregnant!

Logging in Remember me. Log in. Forgot password or user name? Can my 17 year old pregnant girlfriend, get in serious trouble. Posts Latest Activity.

Help! My teen son got his girlfriend pregnant

God placed this pregnancy in your life for a reason. It'll be tough for awhile, i guarantee you of that. What if your parents had aborted you? Maybe they will go on to do amazing things in life too, ya never know. Your parents will be more understanding than you think. I promise. You guys have screwed up by getting pregnant, but you can still make the right decision by having the baby and then taking care of it and loving it and your girlfriend with all you have. Good luck kid.

If it turns out that she's not pregnant then all your worrying is for nothing and your life is exactly the same as it was you won't feel like you can cope with a child6 answers.

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Back to Your pregnancy and baby guide. Finding out you're pregnant when you're a teenager can be daunting, especially if the pregnancy wasn't planned, but help and support is available. First, if you think you might be pregnant but you're not sure, it's important to take a pregnancy test as soon as possible to find out. If your pregnancy test is positive, it's understandable to feel mixed emotions: excitement about having a child, worry about telling your parents, and anxiety about pregnancy and childbirth.

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