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How much protein a man need a day

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Decades of scientific research on nutrition and weight loss has uncovered a few key pieces of information on what helps people successfully win the battle of the bulge. This article is going to cut through a lot of the noise surrounding protein and tell you how much protein you should be eating to lose weight and some of the things you should consider when planning your diet. Protein is an important macronutrient that is involved in nearly all bodily functions and processes. It plays a key role in exercise recovery and is an essential dietary nutrient for healthy living. The elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen combine to form amino acids, the building blocks of protein. Protein and amino acids are primarily use to create bodily tissues, form enzymes and cellular transporters, maintain fluid balance, and more.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How Much Protein To Build Muscle? The TRUTH !

How Much Protein Do You Need?

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The average American man consumes more protein than he needs, reports the National Institutes of Health. Men should aim to get between 10 and 35 percent of their daily calories from protein, but many consume twice as much.

While protein is necessary for optimal health, too much may contribute to medical problems. According to statistics compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the average American man between the ages of 19 and 70 weighs approximately pounds and is 5 feet, 8 inches tall.

For this height and weight, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board recommends only about 56 grams of protein each day. Animal protein like beef, pork, chicken, turkey, fish, milk, cheese or eggs provides men with a complete source of protein. These foods contain all of the amino acids the body needs to synthesize its own proteins. However, some animal proteins also contain high levels of fat, saturated fat and cholesterol. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, a 6-ounce serving of porterhouse steak contains 14 grams of saturated fat, over 60 percent of the amount of saturated fat an average man should eat in a day.

To keep his risk of heart disease, high blood cholesterol and cancer low, a man should choose leaner animal proteins like poultry and fish and limit red meat to two 3-ounce servings weekly. Good sources of plant-based protein include beans, nuts, seeds, soybean products like tofu and whole grains, especially wheat. Plant-based foods, with the exception of quinoa and soy, lack one or more of the amino acids needed for protein synthesis.

By eating a variety of plant protein sources each day -- for instance, whole-grain bread at breakfast, rice at lunch and beans with dinner -- the body can create complete protein. Protein from plants is not only lower in fat than animal protein, it provides dietary fiber. High fiber intake is linked to lower blood cholesterol and a decreased risk of diabetes, obesity, heart disease and cancer. The Mayo Clinic recommends that all adults should aim to meet most of their protein needs with plant-based protein.

It's rare for the average man to become deficient in protein, but it may be more likely if he is a strict vegetarian or vegan who eats only a small number of plant protein sources. Without wide variety in a diet that contains little or no animal products, a man may lack enough amino acids for his body to make protein.

The symptoms of protein deficiency include a decrease in muscle tissue, hair loss, excess fluid buildup in the feet and ankles and anemia. Fortunately, protein deficiency can be remedied by simply including more protein in the diet. If a man gets more than 35 percent of his caloric intake from protein and either does not decrease his intake of other nutrients or doesn't increase his activity level, he may gain weight.

In addition, if the majority of his excess protein is from animal sources, his LDL, or "bad," cholesterol level may rise, increasing his risk of cardiovascular disease. Men with kidney disease and diabetes should avoid eating more than their protein RDA since large amounts of the nutrient can exacerbate kidney problems in these individuals. Michelle Kerns writes for a variety of print and online publications and specializes in literature and science topics.

She has served as a book columnist since and is a member of the National Book Critics Circle. Kerns studied English literature and neurology at UC Davis. Skip to main content. Healthy Eating Nutrition Protein.

MedlinePlus: Nutrition and Athletic Performance. About the Author Michelle Kerns writes for a variety of print and online publications and specializes in literature and science topics. Photo Credits beef teriyaki image by Aqeel Ahmed from Fotolia. Customer Service Newsroom Contacts.

How to Calculate Your Protein Needs

Join AARP today. Get instant access to discounts, programs, services and the information you need to benefit every area of your life. Beans and legumes, including all types of dried beans, split peas and lentils, are considered good sources of protein. Yet, unlike with fruits and veggies, we may not focus on getting enough of this important nutrient.

If you are what you eat, what does that make a vegan? A string-bean, milquetoast kind of a guy?

Daily protein intake requirements aren't one-size-fits-all. Here's how to calculate how much you need, how much is too much and who needs more. Protein is the stuff of life. From your hair to your fingernails to your muscles, protein is the glue that holds each cell in your body together, and what makes up many major hormones and antibodies. That's why getting enough protein in your daily diet is important.

How Much Protein Do You Need After 50?

It's important that we eat enough protein each day to cover our body's needs. Protein helps your body to maintain a proper fluid balance, builds and repairs tissues, transports nutrients, and provides other essential functions. Do you know how much protein you need? Everyone needs a different amount and there are many different factors that impact your number. When determining your protein needs, you can either identify a percentage of total daily calories or you can target a specific number of grams of protein to consume per day. You also can use your weight and activity level as well as your lean body mass. Here is a closer look at each method. To get your number and track your intake, you'll need to know how many calories you consume each day. To maintain a healthy weight, you should consume roughly the same number of calories that you burn each day.

How much protein do you need every day?

Protein is essential to good health. You need it to put meat on your bones and to make hair, blood, connective tissue, antibodies, enzymes, and more. But the message the rest of us often get is that our daily protein intake is too high. The RDA is the amount of a nutrient you need to meet your basic nutritional requirements.

Daily protein intake isn't necessarily the same for everyone—here's how to determine how much you should be aiming for. Wondering exactly how much protein you should be consuming each day?

Enter your email and we'll keep you on top of the latest nutrition research, supplement myths, and more. Our evidence-based analysis features unique references to scientific papers. Each member of our research team is required to have no conflicts of interest, including with supplement manufacturers, food companies, and industry funders.

How Much Protein Does the Average Man Need?

The average American man consumes more protein than he needs, reports the National Institutes of Health. Men should aim to get between 10 and 35 percent of their daily calories from protein, but many consume twice as much. While protein is necessary for optimal health, too much may contribute to medical problems. According to statistics compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the average American man between the ages of 19 and 70 weighs approximately pounds and is 5 feet, 8 inches tall.

Figuring out how much of this important macronutrient you need can be confusing. We asked registered dietitians to make it a little simpler. Eating healthy is important, but it can be a process in and of itself: Should I eat organic fruit? Do I need grass-fed beef? Fortunately, things don't have to be so difficult, at least when it comes to arguably the most important macronutrient for active women: protein. Here, why the filling nutrient is such a key part of your diet, how to gauge your individual protein needs, the real scoop about calories in protein—plus protein-packed picks for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and anything in between to help you make sure you're getting enough of it every day.

How Much Protein a Day for an Active Male?

The Protein Calculator estimates the daily amount of dietary protein adults require to remain healthy. Children, those who are highly physically active, and pregnant and nursing women typically require more protein. The calculator is also useful for monitoring protein intake for those with kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, or other conditions in which protein intake is a factor. Proteins are one of three primary macronutrients that provide energy to the human body, along with fats and carbohydrates. Proteins are also responsible for a large portion of the work that is done in cells; they are necessary for proper structure and function of tissues and organs, and also act to regulate them. They are comprised of a number of amino acids that are essential to proper body function, and serve as the building blocks of body tissue.

Dec 14, - For this height and weight, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board recommends only about 56 grams of protein each day. Animal.

But what is protein, which foods contain it, how much do you need each day… and why? Claiming to promote everything from more energy to weight loss and bigger muscles, protein seems to be the must-have for health. But is the hype justified?

What Eating the *Right* Amount of Protein Every Day Actually Looks Like

Active men need more protein than sedentary men to help maximize athletic performance and improve muscle-to-fat ratio. The amount of protein an active man needs each day is based on his activity level and body weight. The Institute of Medicine recommends that all men, regardless of activity level, consume at least 56 grams of protein every day.

This Is How Much Protein You Need to Eat Every Day

How many grams of protein should a person consume in a day? A lot of people these days are eating a low carbohydrate diet and are increasing their protein intake so that their muscles continue to have the proper amount of nutrition to grow and build. When the body burns all the local carbs throughout the body it will turn to muscle protein for its energy.

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